Declared Dangerous Dogs

The Dog Control Act 2000 contains specific rules and regulations which apply dogs which are declared to be 'dangerous dogs'. Council’s animal management team is responsible for administering the provisions of the Act and Council’s Dog Management Policy relating to dangerous dogs.

A dangerous dog is a dog which Council declared to be dangerous under section 29 of the Dog Control Act 2000.
A dog may be declared dangerous if:

What is a dangerous dog?

A 'dangerous dog' is a dog which Council declared to be dangerous under section 29 of the Act. Council may declare a dog to be a dangerous dog if:

  • The dog has caused serious injury to a person or another animal.
  • There is reasonable cause to believe that a dog is likely to cause serious injury to a person or animal.

Council will notify you in writing of your dog has been declared to be dangerous, and will provide you with the reasons that your dog has been declared dangerous.

Can I appeal Council’s decision?

Yes, you can appeal against Council's decision to declare your dog as dangerous to the Administrative Appeals Division of the Magistrates Court (the Administrative Appeals Court).

Appeals must be lodged with the within 14 days of the declaration notice being served on you.

For further information about lodging an appeal, please visit the Administrative Appeals Court website (external link).

What happens if my dog is declared to be dangerous?

If your dog is declared dangerous, you will be required to abide by a set of strict conditions which are designed to reduce the risk of your dog attacking someone or another dog.

The requirements include very specific rules about the enclosure that your dog must be kept in (see below), as well as the following:

Micro-chipping

A dangerous dog must be micro-chipped within 28 days after you are served with notice of the declaration. You must notify Council of the micro-chip number within 7 days of the micro-chip being inserted.

De-sexing

A dangerous dog must be de-sexed within 28 days after you are served with notice of the declaration. You must provide Council with a copy of the de-sexing certificate within 7 days of the de-sexing procedure.

Approved Collar

A dangerous dog must wear an approved collar at all times. Approved collars are reflective, red and green in colour, and have been approved by the Director of Local Government.

Approved collars are only available through councils.

Warning signs

You must display an approved dangerous dog sign at each entrance to the property where a dangerous dog is kept. Like approved collars, approved signs are only available through councils.

Enclosure requirements for dangerous dogs

Dangerous dogs must be kept in an enclosure that complies with the requirements prescribed in the Dog Control Regulations 2010 regulations (external link) and Council's Dog Management Policy policy (PDF).

Requirements under Regulations

The Regulations set out specific requirements for enclosures that dangerous dogs. The requirements are specific and very onerous. They include requirements that the enclosure:

  • is childproof and fully enclosed
  • has walls, roof and a door or gate made of brick, timber, concrete, iron or mesh of sufficient
  • strength to prevent the escape of the do
  • is at least 1.8 metres high, and
  • has a sealed, graded concrete floor.

Please refer to the Regulations for a full list of the requirements.

If you fail to keep a dangerous dog in an enclosure that complies with the prescribed requirements, your dog may be seized and destroyed.

Requirements under Dog Management Policy

Council's Dog Management Policy imposes additional requirements for the enclosure of dangerous dogs, over and above those specified in the Regulations. The requirements under the Policy include that the enclosure:

  • is at least 9 metres from any dwelling house on another property
  • is at least 2 metres from any boundary of the premises on which the yard is constructed
  • is constructed in such a way as to provide effective methods of cleaning and disinfection
  • has a raised suitable sleeping area for the dog or dogs it houses
  • provides adequate ventilation and insulation to maintain a comfortable internal temperature, freedom from condensation, and an adequate supply of fresh air for the dog/s
  • provides a suitable and sanitary method of disposal of excrement and other waste.

Council will notify you in writing of your dog has been declared dangerous, and will provide you with the reasons that your dog has been declared as dangerous.